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Introducing the PTG

Well we are finally ready to reveal our awesome new product idea and our solution for this years FLL Project Challenge. We are proud to present the PTG (Physical Therapy Game)!

PTG is a revolutionary new physical therapy strength tester designed to provide quick and easy strength testing.  But that is where the similarities to other strength testers end, because PTG will incorporate games into the strength testing and exercises.  PTG will focus on the muscles of your fingers, hands, arms, feet, torso and legs using several attachments. Our game is also fun because it incorporates different activities that test your strength and exercises that will increase your strength.  It will have little people that motivate and help you along your journey.  The game will also be able to send e-mails to the physical therapist that show the person’s progress. We will also have blog posts about how our project is going and what we’ve come up with.  We have a provisional patent, which gives up a year to further develop our product and make a decision if we will apply for a regular patent. The money we get from this we would like to put toward our college fund.  Our coach knows a patent attorney and we hope to get in touch with soon.

Here is a few pictures of our PTG design...

 

 

 

Scope of Audiences

PTG will help rehabilitate millions of people, including:

* The 6.8 million people who suffer fractures every year and lose strength.

* The over 40 million people who suffer from arthritis. x

* The 3.5 million people with sports related injuries per year. x

* Over 200,000 people per year with ACL injuries.

 (References)

http://physicaltherapy.about.com/od/typesofphysicaltherapy/a/WhoneedsPT.htm

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_many_sports_related_injuries_are_there_in_a_year

http://www.caring4arthritis.com/go/community/nursescorner/how-many-people-have-arthritis.htm

http://orthopedics.about.com/cs/otherfractures/a/fracture.htm

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/89442-overview

 

Why PTG is better than the Wii

                PTG is better than the Wii because it is specifically tailored to physical therapy exercises.  The Wii is not, and so physical therapists had to adapt the normal Wii games to their exercises.  The Wii also has no way to track the person’s strength and record it.  PTG will track and record lots of data and show it to the player in easy to understand charts and diagrams at the end of their game session.    PTG not only tracks strength and records it but it also sends it to their physical therapist.  The data will be changed from the easy to understand charts and diagrams to a more complex version more like what the physical therapist would have in their systems.  PTG tests and works the muscles of the fingers, hands, arms, legs, feet and torso while the Wii typically only uses the arms and legs.  This makes PTG a much greater asset for physical therapists than the Wii as they can use it for much more strength testing and muscle building.  All of these things combined make PTG much better for physical therapy than the Wii.

 

 

FLL PRESENTATION -“PTG”

December 6, 2010

 MICAELA’S PART

As we started brainstorming for this years’ body-forward challenge, we quickly found out that one of our team members has a medical condition called Osteogenesis Imperfecta. OI is a condition where your bones are brittle and are prone to breaking very easily. Having OI is very difficult and often painful because when doing simple, everyday things you can suddenly feel a break. This involves taking trips to the hospital, getting casts, and after being in castification (our name for being a cast), going to physical therapy in order to help regain the muscle strength you lost. In order to see how being confined to wheelchairs and other certain medical things, we did an experiment. After “dressing up” in our handicaps, we traveled to the post office, up the levy, and all around town. A lot of people gawked at us. It surprised our team how difficult it was to do simple, everyday things. It proved to be a big challenge, and we saw how being unable to have the ability to do usually easy things could be a real pain.

 JAREN’S PART

            Moving onto the problem, we found several different ones. First we figured out that when bones are in a cast the muscles in that area become weak from not being used. When the muscles are weak then there is a better chance of the bones getting re-injured. So to regain strength, the patient must then go to Physical Therapy for rehabilitation.

Our next step was to interview an expert on the issue. So we visited Mrs. Heather Tippee which is a PT at Upper Valley Medical Center in Troy Ohio . She was able to show the group some of the testing techniques she does with her patients. We also learned about the different types of exercises necessary to strengthen the various muscles we were interested in. We also found out that she actually worked with a patient that has Stage 3 OI and some details about this experience. (MORE INFO AFTER INTERVIEW)

 IAN ’S PART

We have identified that the primary problem is decreased muscle strength after time in castification. The secondary problem is the inconvenience of going to the physical therapist (or torturer). For one, gas prices are going higher everyday, and it can get very expensive driving the PT all the time. Older people may have to get rides to the PT, and that makes it hard to have PT in the first place.

Also, when you trust the human opinion to test muscle strength, you have a lot of variables. For example, depending on the PT’s personal strength, it is possible for one to think a person is weak and another strong. If a PT is tired, he might think a person is stronger than they really are. It is really annoying to have to go there twice a week and to have to go through the same exercises without any rewards.

 ZACH’S PART

Now that you have heard the problem, here is our solution. Allow us to introduce PTG!

PTG is a revolutionary new physical therapy strength tester designed to provide quick and easy strength testing.  But that is where the similarities to other strength testers end, because PTG will incorporate games into the strength testing and exercises.  PTG will focus on the muscles of your fingers, hands, arms, feet, torso and legs using several attachments. 

·        The push/pull lever: The aptly named push/pull lever is for testing the pushing and pulling strength of your arms.

·        The pinch-o-meter: The pinch-o-meter measures the force of your finger pinch.

·        The hand strength tester: The hand strength tester measures your hands squeezing strength.

·        We also plan to integrate the Wii balance board for balance testing.

 DAVID’S PART

Our game is also fun because it incorporates different activities that test your strength and exercises that will increase your strength.  It will have little people that motivate and help you along your journey.  The game will also be able to send e-mails to the physical therapist that show the person’s progress. 

We will also have blog posts about how our project is going and what we’ve come up with.  We have a provisional patent, which gives up a year to further develop our product and make a decision if we will apply for a regular patent. The money we get from this we would like to put toward our college fund.  Our coach knows a patent attorney in Columbus and we hope to get in touch with soon.  Thank you so much. :)

 

Copyright 2010